Week 17 – Concentration Is Misunderstood

17:6 – “Concentration is much misunderstood; there seems to be an idea of effort or activity associated with it, when just the contrary is necessary. The greatness of an actor lies in the fact that he forgets himself in the portrayal of his character, becoming so identified with it, that the audience is swayed by the realism of the performance. This will give you a good idea of true concentration; you should be so interested in your thought, so engrossed in your subject, as to be conscious of nothing else. Such concentration leads to intuitive perception and immediate insight into the nature of the object concentrated upon.”

Haanel continues in part 17:7 “All knowledge is the result of concentration of this kind; it is thus that the secrets of Heaven and Earth have been wrested; it is thus that the mind becomes a magnet and the desire to know draws the knowledge, irresistibly attracts it, makes it your own.”

I’ve been concentrating on this a good bit this week in my silent time and believe I am starting to glimpse the significance and the fact that this type of concentration has been not quite at the level required to precipitate the needed intuitive perception and related knowledge to move
my desires forward.

In 17:8 the final clue is exposed… It is not the conscious thinking and concentration that is the catalyst, it is the point at which these mechanisms take on a life of function of their own within the realm of the subconscious! Here, read this… “Desire is largely subconscious; conscious desire rarely realizes its object when the latter is out of immediate reach. Subconscious desire arouses the latent faculties of the mind, and difficult problems seem to solve themselves.” (part 17:8).

So, it has been our practice to date to sit and perform the exercises (i.e. concentrate on our objectives) as instructed in order to bring ourselves into contact with and learn the mechanics of bringing it into the material world. I now see and feel a calming sense that this was to load our conscious mind with these objectives such that it informed my subconscious mind sufficiently to take over the task were the real effortless work begins.

Like Water Which Can Clearly Mirror The SelfMizu (water) no Kokoro in this interpretation is wrong and misses the point. Kokoro is the word for “heart” not mind. Let’s say we now think on the Zen practice of Mushin. “The concept of Mushin is identical to the Japanese metaphorical expression “mizu no kokoro” or the “mind like water.” This mental attitude refers to a mind that is in total harmony with the Cosmos that it resembles a still pond of water without any ripples where the surface reflects a clear and perfectly undistorted image of the surroundings, like a mirror. When applied the Master Key Systems way it is best described as, “No mind, a mind without ego. A mind like a mirror which reflects and does not judge.”

So, let me wrap-up my hypothesis. If we speak of the desires of being in heart, and the heart has cognitive functions such as we espouse within the English language when we say to someone “what does your heart say” or “think with your heart, not with your head”, now we have the full equation. My intention then is, or rather should be, to think or concentrate with my heart (as it knows my real desire and can impregnate it with love and gratitude) on those things that reflect those desires that are in my heart like calm water without fear or agitation. This enables the reflection of what is within to be materialized without. Concentration is being so consumed by these thoughts of our desired outcome, based on our heart that confidence, faith and hope conspire to infuse my face with a gentle smile and to show to the world a truly authentic me. When I have achieved this state, holding my desires with sufficient faith, this synchronizes these ideal vibrations and conditions to be drawn to me like the horizontal joint between water and sky at the horizon. A perfect reflection of within; without.

Blue Pond of Water

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